Reading Facts Practice

Reading facts is the most common question types in McKinsey PST (38%). These questions test your ability to understand the fact / data itself. There will be no inferring, logic, hypothesizing, or creativity needed. See the illustrating picture below.

Word Problem Practice

All questions are word problem questions. This question type represents about 8% of all questions on the McKinsey Problem Solving Test. In this sample practice, you should aim for 2/2 correct answers.

Root-cause Reason Practice

All questions are root-cause questions. This question type represents about 13% of all questions on the McKinsey Problem Solving Test. This question is written based on an official McKinsey practice PST question.

Formulae Practice

All questions are formulae questions. This question type represents about 5% of all questions on the McKinsey Problem Solving Test. This question is written based on an official McKinsey practice PST question.

Client Interpretation Practice

All questions are client interpretation  questions. This question type represents about 8% of all questions on the McKinsey Problem Solving Test. This question is written based on an official McKinsey practice PST question.

Fact-based Conclusion Practice

All questions are fact-based conclusion questions. This question type represents about 14% of all questions on the McKinsey Problem Solving Test. This question is written based on an official McKinsey practice PST question.

  • Joana

    Hello! Can I have some feedback regarding Question 2 of Word Problem Practice? Here’s my logic, for 1 month:
    Cost = Benefit = 200 k$
    Benefit = 100$*(Computers sold) = 100$*(New Conversion Rate)*(Visitors) = 100$*(1.2*0.05)*(Visitors)
    200 k$ = 100$*0.06*Visitors Visitors = 33 000 => Minimum wold be answer A (100 000 visitors), but apparently is answer B (200 000)!
    Did I misinterpreted something ?
    Thank you !

    • Alex Hunt

      For the campaign to be considered profitable, it has to generate $200,00 on its own, completely separate from the sale that the retailer is already pulling in.
      The campaign raises the conversion rate from 5% to 6%, which means it creates an extra $1 per customer.
      From there, we can see that the retailer needs at least 200,000 visits to make the campaign profitable.

    • Taher

      You’ve missed an important assumption here that there were expenses before the marketing campaign as well.
      Let the number of visitations be x, and n be the overall expense before marketing campaign.
      So we have x*5%*$100 = n ( to break even)
      After the marketing expense
      x*5%*120%*$100 = n + $200,000
      solving for x we get 200,000 visits.